RSS

Interesting neurology

13 Dec

After you've had a fine dinner with some friends, your memories of their faces, the taste of the food, and the music that was playing are distributed in the various visual, olfactory, and auditory areas of the brain, but they are all connected together by the hippocampus to form an "episode", rather than remaining a collection of separate memories. It seems to be the hippocampus that enables you to “play the scene back”, by reactivating this particular activity pattern in the various regions of the cortex.

But after a while, these various cortical regions activated during an event would become so strongly linked with one another that they would no longer need the hippocampus to act as their link. The memory of a piece of music that was playing that night could be enough to bring back the entire scene of the dinner party.

If we don't remember anything from our early childhood, like before our 4th birthday that's because hippocampus, part of the limbic system deep in the brain that stores long-term memories, had not yet matured. That doesn't mean earlier memories don't exist in our mind.

Here is one example: a woman was left by her father when she was just 2 years old. She can't consciously remember how he got drunk sometimes and abused her mother. But the emotions associated with the memory might be stored in her amygdala, another structure in the brain's limbic system that may be functional as early as birth. While highly emotional memories etched in the amygdala may not be accessible to the conscious mind, they might still influence the way we act and feel beyond our awareness.

The last area of the brain to reach maturity is the prefrontal cortex, where the so-called executive brain resides—where we make social judgments, weigh alternatives, plan for the future, and hold our behavior in check.

"The executive brain doesn't hit adult levels until the age of 25," says Jay Giedd of the National Institute of Mental Health, one of the lead scientists on the neuroimaging studies. "At puberty, you have adult passions, sex drive, energy, and emotion, but the reining in doesn't happen until much later." It is no wonder, that teenagers seem to lack good judgment or the ability to restrain impulses. "We can vote at 18," says Giedd, "and drive a car. But you can't rent a car until you're 25."

Advertisements
 
11 Comments

Posted by on December 13, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

Tags:

11 responses to “Interesting neurology

  1. gdare

    December 13, 2010 at 10:12 pm

    I remember once I was in a bus with my mum, it was warm day and we were going somewhere in center of Zemun. I remember I was too small to see through a window. This was, for sure, my earliest conscious memory. And by the height of those bus seats I don`t think I was more than 3 years old :left:

     
  2. WinterForLady

    December 14, 2010 at 5:12 pm

    That is nice Darko, thank you for sharing here your first memory 🙂 I am not sure what is my first memory. I think I remember something before I was 5 years old but maybe that is not my true memory, it could be based on the stories parents told me.

     
  3. gdare

    December 14, 2010 at 8:12 pm

    Yes, it is tricky sometimes, the mind :left:

     
  4. qlue

    December 15, 2010 at 1:12 pm

    I was about three when I remember sitting with my father and having 'breakfast'. He would have 'dry' bread and coffee when he got back from night shift and I would sit and eat with him. :happy:.My father died a few months before I turned four. So everything I remember of him is from younger than four years of age. :left:.

     
  5. gyng

    December 15, 2010 at 8:12 pm

    Cool…Even though it's sometimes tricky to guess what is your true memory and what did your parents tell you…I think that my first memory is me in the sea with my sister and her 'fighting' with parents to take some orange swimming muscles from me and also that summer at sea I remember I've lost my shoes in the sea…I loved those shoes…I think I was very young, not sure how young but it is the last time my family went to sea…:(

     
  6. gdare

    December 15, 2010 at 10:12 pm

    :sing: First thing I remember, I was laying on a bed,I couldn`t be no more than one or two… :sing:

     
  7. WinterForLady

    December 18, 2010 at 2:12 pm

    Aadil and Gyng, thank you for sharing your first memories. 🙂 I am only one here who doesn't have so early memories..I can't remember what is my first memory :awww: Maybe under some hypnosis I would remember 😀

     
  8. gyng

    December 23, 2010 at 4:12 pm

    Originally posted by MirabelaTM:

    Maybe under some hypnosis I would remember

    I think that should work or…Try thinking about it…Concentrate on some photo of you when you were lets say 3 years old and try to hear voices…I remember this experience at the sea only because it was very strong feeling so if you didn't experience happenings around you hard you would probably forget it easily… 🙂 But I also have very good memory son…

     
  9. gyng

    December 23, 2010 at 4:12 pm

    Originally posted by MirabelaTM:

    Maybe under some hypnosis I would remember

    I think that should work or…Try thinking about it…Concentrate on some photo of you when you were lets say 3 years old and try to hear voices…I remember this experience at the sea only because it was very strong feeling so if you didn't experience happenings around you hard you would probably forget it easily… 🙂 But I also have very good memory so…

     
  10. qlue

    December 24, 2010 at 7:12 am

    Actually, there's a lot of debate as to whether hypnosis is of any real use for recovering 'lost' memories. :left:.Some research suggests that hypnosis is more likely to create false memories than it is to recover lost memories. :up:.The best approach, in my opinion, is to try to meditate.First, choose a place with few distractions. If you must have music playing, try to get some music that would have been on the radio when you were a child. Don't try for a silent place though, people seldom live in a 'silent' world. Get hold of a bottle of the type of aftershave/perfume your parents used to use back then.The next step is to think about feeling happy, that special feeling when, as a child, everything was just perfect.Our strongest memories are associated with extreme emotions like unwrapping presents on Christmas morning or the distress of a car accident. :left:.Try speaking to your parents, uncles, aunts etc. about special events that happened around you when you were a child. Often, a single word, in context, can trigger a special memory that you seem to have forgotten. :up:.Our brains don't actually record everything in our lives. It only records significant events. However, those events, once recorded, are never forgotten. :hat:. We simply 'forget' to think about them untill something triggers that memory. :up:.Another interesting thing is that we don't have a perfect recall of events. We may, for example, remember a birthday party but forget that certain family members were there. (because they weren't significant in our lives at that time.)We might also find that the sequence of a certain event was not quite the way we remember it. This is a well known phenomenon that often shows up in court cases. (several witnesses might all recall that there was three shots, but can't agree who shot first, or if is was two shots then one or the other way round)This is caused by our brain's way of storing events. The 'most significant' aspect of an event will usually be stored as the starting point of the event. Less significant things will follow in our memory (even he they actually happened first)

     
  11. WinterForLady

    January 1, 2011 at 6:01 pm

    Gyng and Aadil, thank you both 🙂 Yes, meditation looks like a good method to remember.

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Humanity in Syria is at risk

4 out of 5 dentists recommend this WordPress.com site

daily or thereabouts...

daily fray may keep me away...

tomboys|don't|cry

~ someday never comes ~

Jill Gallery

Photo of the Week or Thereabouts - A compression of our days. Sometimes just a theoretical snapshot.

gdare

Walking over sky, following a bird...

Mit's blog

Daily life

Chrysopeleia

The story of my dreams coming true

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: